Fear Factor

We all have our fears.  For some it may be spiders, for others heights, and for yet others clowns can be terrifying.  Most of the time we can keep our fears under control, but sometimes they turn into phobias.  A phobia is much stronger than a fear – it can be totally paralysing.

10 Most Common Phobias

But what are the most common phobias?  The list below is provided by the website fearof.net after extensive research.  Do any of them affect you?

Number 10 is the fear of holes. Did you know that was known as trypophobia?  Sufferers are not only afraid of holes in the ground, but also those in coral, honeycomb and Swiss cheese for example.  They find the sight of a hole so distressing that they will take extreme measures to avoid them.

Number 9 is the more familiar fear of flying, known as aerophobia.  This affects nearly 6.5% of the world’s population, and is closely linked with fear of confined spaces and of being unable to escape.  Fairly obviously, it affects sufferers’ ability to travel but can also impact on professional life if air travel is necessary for work.  Even the thought of flying can cause nausea, panic attacks and a sense of dread in the sufferer.

Number 8 is mysophobia, the fear of germs.  This is closely related to obsessive compulsive disorder as sufferers indulge in excessive hand washing.  It can have serious effects on people’s social lives as they take increasingly extreme precautions to avoid contamination.

Number 7, claustrophobia, affects about 7% of the world’s population.  The fear of small spaces is closely linked to fear of suffocation.  Although it has been studied to a great extent by scientists, only 2% of sufferers are believed to seek treatment.

Astraphobia, the fear of thunder and lightning, is number 6.  It’s most common in children but can persist into adulthood.  Storms become a source of extreme terror.  Astraphobia can even affect wild animals.  Fortunately, at least for humans, it is very responsive to treatment.

Number 5 is the fear of dogs, otherwise known as cynophobia.  To a dog-lover like myself this is inexplicable but it’s one of the most common animal phobias around the world.  It’s interesting to note that the majority of cynophobes are also afraid of cats.  It’s far more common in women than in men, and usually develops in childhood.

Agoraphobia, the fear of open spaces, is number 4.  The sufferer feels panic at the mere thought of visiting theatres, shopping malls or wide open spaces.  Eventually a vicious circle is established.  The sufferer avoids going out and his or her world decreases in size.  In severe cases, only the home feels safe.

Number 3 is the fear of heights, or acrophobia.  This is usually, but not always, associated with the fear of falling.  It can cause severe panic states which somewhat paradoxically increase the risk of falling.

Number 2 is ophidiophobia, the fear of snakes.  Indiana Jones was not alone!  It affects nearly 33% of the adult population.  To an extent, it’s a valid fear – snakes can obviously be dangerous.  But to a true ophidiophobic, a harmless grass snake is as terrifying as a cobra.  Even a picture of a snake can induce panic.

So what is the number 1 phobia worldwide?  You’ve probably already guessed – it’s arachnophobia of course.  Fear of spiders is incredibly widespread around the world.  Again, in some countries a healthy wariness of spiders is sensible.  In the UK, however, the paralysing fear of spiders that some people experience is not helpful.

So do you suffer from any of these?  Or maybe you have a phobia that’s I haven’t listed above.  If you have a fear that is so strong it interferes with your life, don’t hesitate to get help from a hypnotherapist.

Author: Nigel Szczepaniak

I have spent more than thirty years working as a Pharmacist but have now also qualified as a Hypnotherapist and NLP Coach. I live in beautiful Berwick upon Tweed, Northumberland.

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